Nathan Hales Wiki – Nathan Hales Biography

Nathan Hales is a well-known celebrity from Unknown. So let’s check out Nathan Hales’s personal and public life facts, Wikipedia, bio, spouse, net worth, and career details. Nathan Hales was born in the Shooting in 1996.

BirthName, Nickname, and Profession

So first, let’s take a look at some personal details of Nathan, like name, nickname, and profession.

Real NameNathan Hales
NicknameNathan
Professionsport shooter

It may be possible he has some more nicknames and if you know, make sure you mention them in the comment box.

Age, Birthdate, Religion, and BirthPlace

If you may want to know more about Nathan, so we also cover other personal details.
This section will get Nathan’s age, birthday, religion, hometown, food habits, and birthplace details.

Age (2021)25 Years
Birthplace
Date Of Birth16 June 1996
SunsignGemini
Hometown
Food HabitsNot Available
NationalityBritish

Nathan Hales was born on 16 June 1996 in . Nathan age is 25 years as of in 2021 and his birthplace is .
Currently, He is living in , and working as sport shooter.
By nationality, He is British, and currently, his food habit is mix vegetarian & non-vegetarian.
He also worships all the Gods and goddesses and also celebrates all the festivals.
His hobby is acting. He loves doing acting in movies and shows.

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Height, Weight, And Body Measurements

Nathan’s height is Not Available tall and he looks tall when standing with his friends. Though he is a little tall as compared to his friends still he manages to maintain his weight.
His weight is around Not Available and he always exercises to maintain that. He loves to do exercises regularly and also tells others to do that.
According to Nathan, you must have to do exercise regularly to stay fit. his body measurements are not available currently, but we will update them very soon.

HeightNot Available
In Meter: not available
In Feet: not available
WeightNot Available
In Pound: not available

Nathan Hales Spouse, Wife, , Personal Life

ParentNot Available
FatherNot Available
MotherNot Available
BrotherNot Available
SisterNot Available
Marital Statusnot available
Wifenot available
GirlfriendUpdate Soon
Children

Nathan’s father’s name is Not Available. We have no more Information about Nathan Father; we will try to collect information and update soon.
Nathan’s mother’s name is Not Available. We have no more Information about Nathan Father; we will try to collect information and update soon.
Also, we have no idea about his brother and sister, and we don’t know their names either.
But we are trying hard to collect all the information about Nathan and will update you soon.
his Girlfriend’s name is Not Available. They are in relation from previous few years of strong relationship. We have no information about Nathan’s Girlfriend.
But we are sure that Nathan is not available and his Wife’s name is not available. Now, his relationship is perfect. We have no more information about his Wife.
Also, we have no information about his son and daughter. We can’t say their name. If you know some information, please comment below.

Nathan Hales Net Worth

The Nathan Hales Estimated Net worth is $80K – USD $85k.

Monthly Income/Salary (approx.)$80K – $85k USD
Net Worth (approx.)$4 million- $6 million USD

Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram

InstagramNot Available
TwitterNot Available
FacebookNathan Hales Facebook Profile

Fast Facts You Need To Know

2014

Hate of oppression’s arbitrary plan,
The love of freedom, and the rights of man;
A strong desire to save from slavery’s chain
The future millions of the western main,
And hand down safe, from men’s invention cleared,
The sacred truths which all the just revered;
For ends like these, I wish to draw my breath,”
He bravely cried, “or dare encounter death.”
And when a cruel wretch pronounced his doom,
Replied, ” ‘Tis well,—for all is peace to come;
The sacred cause for which I drew my sword
Shall yet prevail, and peace shall be restored.
I’ve served with zeal the land that gave me birth,
Fulfilled my course, and done my work on earth;
Have ever aimed to tread that shining road
That leads a mortal to the blessed God.
I die resigned, and quit life’s empty stage,
For brighter worlds my every wish engage;
And while my body slumbers in the dust,
My soul shall join the assemblies of the just.

I can now in imagination see his person & hear his voice—his person I should say was a little above the common stature in height, his shoulders of a moderate breadth, his limbs strait & very plump: regular features—very fair skin—blue eyes—flaxen or very light hair which was always kept short—his eyebrows a shade darker than his hair & his voice rather sharp or piercing—his bodily agility was remarkable. I have seen him follow a football and kick it over the tops of the trees in the Bowery at New York, (an exercise which he was fond of)—his mental powers seemed to be above the common sort—his mind of a sedate and sober cast, & he was undoubtedly Pious; for it was remark’d that when any of the soldiers of his company were sick he always visited them & usually Prayed for & with them in their sickness.

1966

Aside from the site at 66th Street and Third Avenue, three other sites in Manhattan claim to be the hanging site:

1950

British General William Howe had established his headquarters in the Beekman House in a then-rural part of Manhattan, on a rise between what are now 50th and 51st Streets between First and Second Avenues, near where Beekman Place commemorates the connection. Hale reportedly was questioned by Howe, and physical evidence was found on him. Rogers provided information about the case. According to tradition, Hale spent the night in a greenhouse at the mansion. He requested a Bible; his request was denied. Sometime later, he requested a clergyman. Again, the request was denied.

1941

It is almost certain that Hale’s last speech contained more than one sentence. Several early accounts mention different things he said. These are not necessarily contradictory, but rather, together they give an idea of what the speech might have been like. The following quotes are all taken from George Dudley Seymour’s book, Documentary Life of Nathan Hale, published in 1941 by the author.

1855

Two early ballads also attempt to recreate Hale’s last speech. Songs and Ballads of the Revolution (1855), collected by F. Moore, contained the “Ballad of Nathan Hale” (anonymous), dated 1776: “Thou pale king of terrors, thou life’s gloomy foe, Go frighten the slave; go frighten the slave; Tell tyrants, to you their allegiance they owe. No fears for the brave; no fears for the brave.”; and “To the Memory of Capt. Nathan Hale” by Eneas Munson, Sr., was written soon after Hale’s death:

1781

From the Independent Chronicle and the Universal Advertiser, May 17, 1781: “I am so satisfied with the cause in which I have engaged, that my only regret is, that I have not more lives than one to offer in its service.”

1777

From the Essex Journal, February 13, 1777: “However, at the gallows, he made a sensible and spirited speech; among other things, told them they were shedding the blood of the innocent, and that if he had ten thousand lives, he would lay them all down, if called to it, in defence of his injured, bleeding Country.”

1776

Hale was also a part of Knowlton’s Rangers, the first organized intelligence service organization of the United States of America, led by Lieutenant Colonel Thomas Knowlton. In the spring of 1776, the Continental Army moved to Manhattan to defend New York City against the anticipated British attack. In August, the British soundly defeated the Continentals in the Battle of Long Island via a flanking move from Staten Island across Brooklyn. General George Washington was desperate to determine the location of the imminent British invasion of Manhattan; to that end, Washington called for a spy behind enemy lines, and Hale was the only volunteer.

Hale volunteered on September 8, 1776, to go behind enemy lines and report on British troop movements. It was an act of spying that was immediately punishable by death and posed a great risk to Hale. He was ferried across the East River to Huntington, New York, on British-controlled Long Island, on September 12. Hale planned to disguise himself as a Dutch schoolteacher looking for work, though he did not travel under an assumed name and reportedly carried with him his Yale diploma bearing his real name.

While Hale was undercover, New York City (then the area at the southern tip of Manhattan, mostly south of what is now Chambers Street) fell to British forces on September 15, and Washington was forced to retreat to the island’s north in Harlem Heights (what is now Morningside Heights). Shortly after, on September 21, a quarter of the lower portion of Manhattan burned in the Great New York Fire of 1776. The fire was later widely thought to have been started by American saboteurs in order to keep the city from falling into British hands, and though setting fire to New York during Washington’s retreat had indeed been proposed, Washington and the Congress had rejected the idea and denied responsibility for the fire after its outbreak. It has also been speculated that the fire was the work of British soldiers acting without orders. In the fire’s aftermath, more than 200 American partisans were detained by the British for questioning.

According to the standards of the time, spies were hanged as illegal combatants. On the morning of September 22, 1776, Hale was marched along Post Road to the Park of Artillery, which was next to a public house called the Dove Tavern (at modern-day 66th Street and Third Avenue), and hanged. He was 21 years old.

From the diary of Enoch Hale, Nathan’s brother, after he went to question people who had been present, October 26, 1776: “When at the Gallows he spoke & told them that he was a Capt in the Cont Army by name Nathan Hale.”

1775

After the Revolutionary War began in 1775, Hale joined a Connecticut militia unit and was elected first lieutenant within five months. His company participated in the Siege of Boston, but Hale remained behind. It has been suggested that he was unsure as to whether he wanted to fight, or possibly that he was hindered because his teaching contract in New London did not expire until several months later, in July 1775. On July 4, 1775, Hale received a letter from his classmate and friend Benjamin Tallmadge, who had gone to Boston to see the siege for himself. He wrote to Hale, “Was I in your condition, I think the more extensive service would be my choice. Our holy Religion, the honor of our God, a glorious country, & a happy constitution is what we have to defend.” Tallmadge’s letter was so inspiring that, several days later, Hale accepted a commission as first lieutenant in the 7th Connecticut Regiment under Colonel Charles Webb of Stamford.

1755

Nathan Hale (June 6, 1755 – September 22, 1776) was an American soldier and spy for the Continental Army during the American Revolutionary War. He volunteered for an intelligence-gathering mission in New York City but was captured by the British and executed. Hale has long been considered an American hero and, in 1985, he was officially designated the state hero of Connecticut.

Nathan Hale was born in Coventry, Connecticut, in 1755, to Richard Hale and Elizabeth Strong. In 1769, when he was fourteen years old, he was sent with his brother Enoch, who was sixteen, to Yale College. Nathan was a classmate of fellow Patriot spy Benjamin Tallmadge. The Hale brothers belonged to the Linonian Society of Yale, which debated topics in astronomy, mathematics, literature, and the ethics of slavery. Nathan graduated with first-class honors in 1773 at age 18 and became a teacher, first in East Haddam and later in New London.

1692

Hale was the great-grandson of Reverend John Hale, an important figure in the Salem witch trials of 1692. Nathan Hale was also the uncle of orator and statesman Edward Everett (the other speaker at Gettysburg) and the grand-uncle of Edward Everett Hale (quoted above), a Unitarian minister, writer, and activist noted for social causes including abolitionism. He was the uncle of journalist Nathan Hale, who founded the Boston Daily Advertiser and helped establish the North American Review.

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